The Obvious Game

The Obvious Game

eBook - 2013
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Everyone trusted me back then. Good old, dependable Diana. Which is why most people didn't notice at first." The Obvious Game is a journey into anorexia. Diana starts out normal enough, but soon the spiraling reality of her mother's health and her growing relationship with a high school wrestler cutting weight find her helpless against the new rules taking shape in her mind. Read on to finally understand the psychology of anorexia ... and how Diana found her way back. An important read on a complex and confusing mental illness. --Provided by publisher.
Publisher: [Place of publication not identified] : Inkspell Publishing, 2013
ISBN: 9780985656270
Characteristics: 1 online resource
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Additional Contributors: enki Library (Online service)

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EricaReynolds
Feb 11, 2013

“The first week, Ma stayed in the oncology ward’s intensive care unit. Pa and I delivered her a new toothbrush and underwear in a Ziploc baggie, the kind she usually used for grapes.”

e
EricaReynolds
Feb 11, 2013

“I didn’t trust he was touching me to comfort me. He just wanted to see how many other bones he could feel, so he could tell me he was right and I was wrong.”

e
EricaReynolds
Feb 11, 2013

“He looked pointedly at my hands. I looked down to see the veins standing out, ropy against my pale hands.”

e
EricaReynolds
Feb 11, 2013

“Pa pulled a handkerchief out of his pocket and handed it to me. It smelled like him, like the inside of a tractor—grease and cold and corn.”

e
EricaReynolds
Feb 11, 2013

“Lin squeezed my head under the table, and when I looked over at her, her eyes glistened. I smiled at her that smile you make when you’re not sure what else to do.”

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EricaReynolds
Feb 11, 2013

Within a few lines of The Obvious Game, I was right back in high school—for good and bad. Although it was a high school experience that was much more drama-filled than my own, I instantly recognized it, and it felt itchy and intense. I respect any author that can transport me so quickly and completely. I couldn’t put it down—as much as because I was pulled deeply into the story as much as I wanted to get the hell back out. I don’t want to be a sophomore again, but I am grateful to the author for the chance to remember why. I loved all the descriptions of high school life in a rural setting. Parties in the woods. Looking out a kitchen window, “watching dawn break over the broken cornstalks in the field behind the house.” All the food the family creates together. Cheap liquor drank right out of the bottle and driving on icy roads for fun. And while it’s not a big theme in the book, it’s a good example of how “country” in this book isn’t something romantic and idealized or hic-ish and disregarded. It’s just real. I loved that she talked about quilting and her Grandma making a cancer quilt for her mother as not something sweet and country but something that connects us with time, meaning, art, warmth, complication and love. I also loved the voice of Diana—sometimes older than her years, sometimes very much a child—like all teenagers, but her voice was unique and compelling. Like other readers, I thought her relationships with her boyfriend and best guy friend were very well-told and felt familiar to me in good ways.

“The birds came back. The days got longer.” Things will finally start getting good right? Spring is coming. No. “And at Ma’s follow-up appointment, the doctor said the cancer was back and growing fast.” I liked that she didn’t give her character a break (as life seldom does), but she still pushes on with bravery.

So much around perceptions and what is actually obvious and what is actually not. It’s about anger at everyone, and trying to control the uncontrollable, about not being able to trust anyone including yourself, about what is right and wrong, self-hatred, and the absence of comfort, and yet also finding comfort, being brave, and feeling connected to one’s family, finding the right friends and trusting love and ultimately your best self. A really wonderful first novel. I look forward to reading her next book (with hopes) very soon.

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EricaReynolds
Feb 11, 2013

EricaReynolds thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

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