The Salt Fix

The Salt Fix

Why the Experts Got It All Wrong--and How Eating More Might Save your Life

Book - 2017
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"We all know the dangers of sugar and salt: but the danger attributed to the second white crystal has more to do with getting too little of it, not too much. A leading cardiovascular research scientist and doctor of pharmacy overturns conventional thinking about salt and explores instead the little-understood importance of it, the health dangers of having too little, and how salt can actually help you improve sports performance, crush sugar cravings, and stave off common chronic illnesses. Too little salt in the diet can shift the body into semi-starvation mode and cause insulin resistance, and may even cause you to absorb twice as much fat for every gram you consume. Too little salt in certain populations can actually increase blood pressure, as well as resting heart rate. We need salt in order to hydrate and nourish our cells, transmit nerve signals, contract our muscles, ensure proper digestion and breathing, and maintain proper heart function. The Salt Fix will show how we wrongly demonized this essential micronutrient as well as explain what the current science really says about this misunderstood mineral and how to maximize its effect so you can enjoy ideal health and longevity"-- Provided by publisher
"A respected cardiovascular research scientist overturns conventional thinking about salt and explores instead the little-understood importance of it, the health dangers of having too little, and how salt can actually help you improve sports performance, crush sugar cravings, and stave off common chronic illnesses"-- Provided by publisher
Publisher: New York : Harmony, 2017
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780451496966
0451496965
Characteristics: 258 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm

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gaetanlion
Nov 26, 2017

The Salt Fix is a great book. Back in 2000, Uffe Ravnskov by conducting rigorous meta-analysis of the existing research uncovered that eating both cholesterol and saturated fat were not associated with cardiovascular disease. He studied the existing research and uncovered systematic data cherry picking and biased interpretation of the statistical results. Once, he removed these statistical flaws there was nothing left of the hypothesis that eating cholesterol and saturated fat cause cardiovascular disease.
Oddly enough, nearly 20 years later many neurologists and nutritionists are tripping over themselves broadcasting that after all fat is good for you (the low-carb high-fat diet, Keto diet, etc.).
Dr. James DiNicolantonio is doing for salt what Ravnskov did for cholesterol and fat. DiNicolantonio is contrasting the studies that advocate the current low-salt consensus with the ones that indicate that we need more salt than the consensus indicates. And, he shows that the latter (high salt) are of better quality than the former (low salt). Unfortunately, the low-salt doctors have pretty much won the war from a political and policy standpoint. And, the low salt guidelines have become predominant.
The author describes the health implication of excessive sugar intake. And, I suspect that by 2030 what he is saying will become the consensus just like fat is ok now (but was not back in 2000 when Ravnskov released his book).
However, the low-salt doctors and policymakers have won the war. DiNicolantonio details the history of this war within a very interesting long chapter (ch. 3) and within Appendix I. It has raged since 1900.
Since 1900, the prevalence of hypertension has risen from 10% to 30% of the population. Yet, over the same period our intake of salt has halved while our intake of sugar has multiplied by over 5 times. Throughout the salt war, 83% of the scientists who had conflict of interests with the food industry did not find any association between the rising sugar intake and obesity and weight gain. Meanwhile, for the scientists who did not have such conflicts the same percentage (83%) did find an association between rising sugar intake and obesity and weight gain. The implications are clear: the rising consumption of sugar, not salt, has paralleled the rise of chronic disease in Europe and the US. These chronic diseases include hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and kidney disease.
Throughout the book, you get that one of our main nutritional problems is our eating way too much sugar and not enough salt. The two go hand-in-hand as the less salt you eat the more you crave sugar. And, there are complex physiological reactions that cause this. Yet, the nutritional policy complex has imparted the ill-effect of excess sugar on the cardiovascular system on salt instead of sugar. And, DiNicolantonio sets the record straight. The problem is really sugar; don’t worry about the salt, you need a lot more of it than what US guidelines suggest.

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