The Disaster Artist

The Disaster Artist

My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made

Book - 2013
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"In 2003, an independent film called The room ... made its disastrous debut in Los Angeles. Described by one reviewer as 'like getting stabbed in the head,' the six-million-dollar film earned a grand total of $1800 at the box office and closed after two weeks. Ten years later, The room is an international cult phenomenon ... In [this book], actor Greg Sestero, Tommy's costar and longtime best friend, recounts the film's long, strange journey to infamy, unraveling mysteries for fans ... as well as the question that plagues the uninitiated: how the hell did a movie this awful ever get made?"-- Provided by publisher
Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, 2013
Edition: First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition
ISBN: 9781451661194
1451661193
Characteristics: xvi, 270 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Additional Contributors: Bissell, Tom 1974-

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v
VonHafenstaaad
Sep 10, 2018

Much, much better than either " The Room " or James Franco's film of the same title. The book is funny and honest about the psychopath who had no clue how to make a movie. the author hints heavily that Wiseau was ( is? ) involved in some sort of nefarious money laundering scheme with Mafia types- which makes the " so bad it's good " film " The Room " seem like a much more seedy and depressing venture.

ArapahoeAndrea Jul 25, 2018

Recommended that you read this book after seeing the original movie "The Room" or at least one of the review videos of the movie. This memoir was an insight into the making of one of the best worst movies ever made. It was as baffling, bizarre and entertaining as one would expect it to be.

ArapahoeKirsten May 16, 2018

This deep dive into the making of "The Room," the best worst movie ever, provides a fascinating account of the set and a glimpse into the mysterious life of Tommy Wiseau, the man behind the film. An engaging story that is thought-provoking, humorous, and strangely inspirational.

a
agoldsby
Mar 31, 2018

If you have seen the James Franco movie, reading the book will feel really redundant. They ripped the pages from the book and put them directly on the screen for your convenience. I've never seen The Room, so the cult nature of the original film is lost on me. However (just like Greg Sestero) I am completely captivated by Tommy Wiseau. I started my career in mental health and adults who survive a traumatic brain injury are fascinating examples of the power of the human will to live. Normally I am telling people to READ & never watch the movie (Hello, Red Sparrow) but in this case I am scouring the internet to find a showing of The Room. I can't wait to throw a spoon at the screen.

r
redtayres
Mar 23, 2018

The Disaster Artist - the movie - seems to have gotten shelved too early, possibly due to the involvement of James Franco and the whole #metoo brouhaha. If you haven't seen it, I recommend it highly. It's comedy of the highest order as well as an excellent film. This book is the perfect follow-up to the movie and I'm not sure I'd have found it compelling had I not first seen the movie. Since I had though, I'll say it: On multiple occasions while reading I had to stop, doubled up in hysterical laughter and too unfocused to continue. There are some extremely funny anecdotes in this book. So here's my recommendation: see the movie (Chronicle critic Mick Lasalle loved it as did I) then read this book. Laughter is good for what ails you and the movie and the book provide a lot of both.

s
sameyeiz
Jan 21, 2018

The book, about a movie, that was just made into a movie... Simply put, "The Disaster Artist" is a great book. Author Greg Sestero tells the story of the making of the cult phenomenon, "The Room." While the behind the scenes look at Tommy Wiseau's famous movie is interesting, the best part of the book is Greg's friendship with Tommy. "The Disaster Artist" is easily the best book on friendship that I have read. See the movie. See the movie about the making of the first movie. But, most of all, read this book.

d
dennismmiller
Sep 14, 2016

Some years ago, legendary film critic Ken Begg opined that the only way a truly great bad movie can be produced in an era of homogenization, market studies and test audiences is as a vanity project. The Room is certainly delightfully terrible in every aspect - from set design to music, but especially the script and acting - and every aspect was under the control of one remarkable man, writer-director-producer-star Tommy Wiseau. But who is Tommy Wiseau?

Since no one seems better qualified to answer that question than best friend and co-star Greg Sestero, it's a bit of a disappointment that he doesn't seem to have a complete answer. Even in private, Wiseau has been reluctant to discuss his life and deliberately mysterious. Even the source of The Room's six million dollar budget is unclear. Yet perhaps Sestero gives the only answer possible - Tommy Wiseau is The Room, and The Room is Tommy Wiseau.

Well-written and consistently entertaining, The Disaster Artist is not only a good description of a slow-motion catastrophe, but also an interesting portrait of struggling actors in LA.

d
diananock
Jul 13, 2015

This is an intriguing portrait of a bizarre man wrapped in a hilarious memoir about one of the worst movies ever made, a literary turducken. I loved it!

l
lukasevansherman
May 10, 2014

Tommy Wiseau's "The Room" has become this generation's "Plan 9" and "Rocky Horror Picture Show." A fixture at Cinema 21, "The Room" really has to be seen to be believed, as it defies all description and logic. In "The Disaster Artist," Greg Sestero, who co-starred in the film as Mark, tells the behind the scenes story, assisted by former Portlander Tom Bissell. There are really three stories here: 1. Sestero's (the least interesting of the 3) very typical following his Hollywood dream. 2. The often absurd making of the film. 3. Wiseau's story, which is maybe the most intriguing, as no one is really sure where he's from. I wish they would've explored Wiseau's life more, as well as the cult afterlife of the film. This book is much more entertaining if you've already seen the film. "You're tearing me apart Lisa!"

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