Sister Carrie

Sister Carrie

Book - 2005
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&&LDIV&&R&&LI&&RSister Carrie&&L/I&&R, by &&LB&&RTheodore Dreiser&&L/B&&R, is part of the &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics&&L/I&&R &&LI&&R &&L/I&&Rseries, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics&&L/I&&R: &&LDIV&&R New introductions commissioned from today''s top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader''s viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics &&L/I&&Rpulls together a constellation of influences--biographical, historical, and literary--to enrich each reader''s understanding of these enduring works.&&L/DIV&&R&&L/DIV&&R&&LP&&RWhen small-town Carrie Meeber arrives in 1890s Chicago, she cannot know what awaits. Callow, beautiful, and alone, she experiences the bitterness of temptation and hardship even as she sets her sights on a better life. Drawn by the seductive desire to rise above her social class, Carrie aspires to the top of the acting profession in New York, while the man who has become obsessed with her gambles everything for her sake and draws near the brink of destruction.&&L/P&&R&&LP&&RDreiser''s first novel, Sister Carrie (1900) was inspired by the life of one of his sisters, who had eloped to New York with a disreputable lover. Its sympathetic depiction of Carrie''s love affairs shocked its publisher, whose grudging efforts won few initial readers until the book''s successful re-publication in 1907. Today it resonates with Dreiser''s clear-sighted understanding of life in the increasingly mercantile world of the big city, and with his belief in the domination of fate over free will. Particularly in the unflinching tragedy of its final chapters, the novel broke new ground in American fiction for its gritty realism and for the character of Carrie, who begins "a half-equipped little knight" and becomes a truly modern woman.&&L/P&&R&&LDIV&&R&&LP style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"&&R&&LSTRONG&&RHerbert Leibowitz&&L/B&&R&&L/B&&R is the editor and publisher of &&LI&&RParnassus: Poetry in Review&&L/I&&R. His books include &&LI&&RFabricating Lives: Explorations in American Autobiography&&L/I&&R and &&LI&&RHart Crane: An Introduction to the Poetry&&L/I&&R. He is currently writing a critical biography of William Carlos Williams.&&L/P&&R&&L/DIV&&R
Publisher: New York : Barnes & Noble Classics, 2005
ISBN: 9781593082260
1593082266
Characteristics: xxix, 462 p. ; 21 cm
Additional Contributors: Lebowitz, Herbert
Stade, George

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BenjaminBraddock
Feb 01, 2016

This is classic Dreiser. I just read it for the second time, the first time was in 1975 for school. It's a much better read when there isn't a term paper required at the end! A bit slow and plodding but that goes well with Dreiser's books.

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Sarah1984
Sep 04, 2014

18/7 - I enjoyed this, but can't really say why. It was quite slow, certainly slower than my normal reading choices; there were no big events and no climatic ending; and none of the main characters were people I wanted to barrack for, for more than a few pages at a time. Carrie had her sympathetic moments, but there were times when I wanted to sit her down and explain the ways of the world or shake some sense into her. I was happy that Carrie finally managed to 'make it' on her own without the help of a man (what I imagine would have been a minor miracle in those days), and almost wanted to say to her "See, you can do it on your own. Drouet and Hurstwood were just dragging you down and holding you back." It was a blessing in disguise that neither of them actually married her.

If you read my reviews regularly you might have read my views on themes and messages within books - that they're not for me and tend to go straight over my head - I just don't see them, unless they're shoved down my throat (and books that do that are another story altogether). So, I don't really know what Dreiser might have been attempting to say with this book, but I did get a feeling of feminine empowerment from Carrie's ability to survive with or without the two men who came into her life. If that's not what Dreiser was trying to say then obviously I wasn't meant to understand it, but I still managed to find enough to interest me and keep me reading (which was a feat in and of itself as at 557 pages this is now the longest book I've read this year).

FrauSison Dec 27, 2013

I first read this for an assignment for my senior English Lit. class over Christmas break in 1987. I chose the author and book from a class list of required reading. Its plot and imagery have stayed with me since then, and I wish to read it again with my middle-age perspective. It must have been a good book.

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dms
Jul 18, 2008

Great American Novel - and a protagonist who is not male.

wonderful descriptions and some very flawed characters. a very good read. the imagery of carrie in her rocking chair is still with me.

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